All first-year and transfer students are admitted to General Engineering, and a major focus of the General Engineering program is to allow students the opportunity to explore the 14 degree-granting engineering majors available at Virginia Tech. Making an informed decision when choosing a degree-granting major is an essential step in graduating from Virginia Tech's College of Engineering. The below resources have been designed to assist students with this exploration, and include a major overview, interest areas, skills, related majors/minor, career resources, ways to get involved, as well as quick facts for each of the 14 engineering disciplines. 

Current Virginia Tech undergraduate students who wish to change to a degree-granting engineering major need to apply through the Change of Major application. This process only happens three times per year. Find out more about the change of major application and process on the Department of Engineering Education’s Change of Major website.

Prospective students should visit the Office of Undergraduate Admission’s website to learn about the admissions process for Virginia Tech’s College of Engineering and are encouraged to attend a College of Engineering Information Session which are held Monday-Friday at 11:15 a.m. (registration is required).

START HERE: Students should use this flow chart to understand how the Explore Engineering tool can be used, regardless of their current status: know about a major and really interested; interested in a major, but don't know much about it; or know a little about the major, but not very interested. The goal is to help students identify three engineering majors they are interested in and would considering pursuing at Virginia Tech. Click here for a printer-friendly version of the flow chart.

 

General Engineering, located in the Department of Engineering Education, is home to Virginia Tech’s first-year engineering program and has a unique role of preparing those students for matriculation into engineering disciplines.

The first-year program provides advising for General Engineering students that helps them integrate into the College of Engineering and enables them to successfully select and enter a major well-suited to their needs and abilities.

The faculty apply research to teaching practices and practice research-based innovations in the classroom to provide the tools, skills, and knowledge necessary for first-year students to become successful engineers and learners.

ENGE 1215: Foundations of Engineering I
First semester of a yearlong sequence of courses that introduce students to the field of engineering. Students learn different ways to solve problems using techniques such as computer programming and data collection and analysis. Students also learn professional and teamwork skills that will help them be successful in a professional engineering setting. Information and advising about the different engineering fields are provided to students as they determine which engineering major to pursue.

ENGE 1216: Foundations of Engineering II
Second semester of the first year engineering experience where students continue to learn skills that are needed in the engineering field. Students work on a semester long design project, learning how to apply the design process to a real-life engineering problem. New analytical skills such as computer modeling are taught in order to help students design and develop their project.

  • Analytical Skills. Engineers use the technical knowledge that they have to gain a theoretical understanding of a problem.
  • Teamwork Skills. Engineers must be able to develop good working relationships where ideas and thoughts can be shared openly with respect.
  • Problem Solving Skills. Engineers must be able to analyze a situation and identify possible problems and improvements.
  • Communication Skills. Engineers work in multi-disciplinary groups and it is necessary that engineers are able to communicate their ideas and thoughts orally or written.
  • Creativity. Engineers work on complex problems and a creative mind helps create innovate solutions.
  • Ethical Integrity. Engineers should be dedicated to providing quality work without being negligent. They must be dedicated to providing solutions that do not cause harm to people or the environment.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook and Engineer of 2020. 

The aerospace engineering curriculum includes the areas of aerodynamics, flight dynamics and controls, propulsion, and aerospace structures. The program culminates in a nationally recognized senior-level sequence including analysis and design of aircraft, spacecraft, and their related technologies.

The program is closely related to ocean engineering, and the two programs share a major portion of their course requirements. A double in aerospace and ocean engineering is available to students desiring this combination.

Contact:

Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering
224-A Randolph Hall
540-231-6699
mkapania@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Aerospace Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Aerodynamics
  • Flight Dynamics
  • Propulsion
  • Structures
  • Analytical skills. Aerospace engineers must be able to identify design elements that may not meet requirements and then must formulate alternatives to improve their performance.
  • Business skills. Much of the work done by aerospace engineers involves meeting federal government standards. Meeting these standards often requires knowledge of standard business practices, as well as knowledge of commercial law.
  • Critical-thinking skills. Aerospace engineers must be able to translate a set of issues into requirements and to figure out why a particular design does not work. They must be able to ask the right question, then find an acceptable answer.
  • Math skills. Aerospace engineers use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Writing skills. Aerospace engineers must be able to write papers that explain their designs clearly and create documentation for future reference.

Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Aerospace Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

Aerodynamics Flight Dynamics Propulsion Structures
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Science and Mechanics
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Ocean Engineering

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

Aerodynamicss Flight Dynamics Propulsion Structures
Meteorology
Nanoscience
Physics

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

Aerodynamics Flight Dynamics Propulsion Structures
Astronomy
Engineering Science and Mechanics
Mathematics
Meteorology
Naval Engineering
Physics
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Biological system engineering (BSE) combines biology, chemistry, and engineering to solve problems associated with environmental protection, conservation of natural resources, the environmentally sound protection of renewable resources, and the conversion of these resources to value-added products such as food, pharmaceuticals, polymers, and biofuels. The curriculum, which is administered by the College of Engineering, includes a minimum of 15 hours of biology and chemistry and differs from other engineering programs in this focus on natural resources and biological materials. Students may focus their studies in career areas such as watershed management, ecological engineering, environmental health engineering, biomolecular engineering, food engineering and biomedical engineering through the selection of 12 credits of BSE electives, 6 credits of engineering electives, and 8 credits of technical electives. Students are encouraged to pursue opportunities in undergraduate research and education abroad offered by the department. Examples of employers of graduates include biotechnology, pharmaceutical, energy, and food companies, as well as government agencies and environmental consulting firms. Graduates are also prepared for admission to professional schools in medicine, dentistry, and veterinary medicine and graduate schools in a variety of disciplines, including biomedical engineering.

Contact:

Department of Biological Systems Engineering
307 Seitz Hall
540-231-2145
bseadvising@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Biological Systems Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomolecular Engineering
  • Environmental Health Engineering
  • Food Engineering
  • Health Professions
  • Watershed Science and Engineering
  • Analytical skills. Because biological systems engineers sometimes design systems that are part of a larger processing or environmental system, they must be able to propose solutions that interact well with other workers, machinery and equipment, and the environment.
  • Creativity. Biological systems engineers must be able to explore new ways of applying engineering principles. They work to invent new materials, advanced manufacturing techniques, and new applications in chemical, biomedical, and environmental engineering.
  • Problem-solving skills. Biological systems engineers work on problems affecting many different aspects of biological systems, from designing a new process for utilizing biological materials to a system for treating storm water runoff. To solve these problems, biological systems engineers must be able to apply general principles of engineering to new circumstances.
  • Initiative. Biological systems engineers must be ready to develop new processes or to design new systems to aid large ecosystems and/or small, controlled microbial systems.
  • Science skills. Biological systems engineers combine biology, chemistry, and engineering to solve complex problems. Biological systems engineers use the fundamental sciences of biology and chemistry to develop sustainable solutions to some of the most pressing problems our society faces: sustainable energy sources, safe water and food supplies, and conservation of natural resources.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Biological Systems Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

Biomedical Engineering Biomolecular Engineering Environmental Health Engineering Food Engineering Health Professions Watershed Science and Engineering
Chemical Engineering    
Civil Engineering          
Computer Science          
Engineering Science and Mechanics        
Materials Science and Engineering        

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Biomedical Engineering Biomolecular Engineering Environmental Health Engineering Food Engineering Health Professions Watershed Science and Engineering
Biochemistry    
Chemistry      
Crop and Soils Sciences        
Environmental Informatics          
Environmental Policy and Planning        
Environmental Science          
Food Science and Technology          
Landscape Architecture*          
Meteorology          
Nanoscience      
Sustainable Biomaterials          
Systems Biology      
Water        

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biomedical Engineering Biomolecular Engineering Environmental Health Engineering Food Engineering Health Professions Watershed Science and Engineering
Biomedical Engineering          
Chemistry      
Environmental Policy and Planning        
Environmental Science        
Geosciences          
Green Engineering  
Philosophy, Policitics, and Economics
Public and Urban Affairs        
Science, Engineering, and Law        
Watershed Management        
Wetland Science          

Chemical engineering students learn to skillfully and creatively apply the principles of chemistry, biochemistry, biology, mathematics, and physics to problems involving energy, food, health, electronics, consumer products, and environmental quality. The core chemical engineering classes involve 44 credit hours of study. Students must also complete a minimum of 20 credit hours in advanced chemistry, including organic chemistry plus lab and physical chemistry plus lab. Several concentration areas are offered, including polymers, biomedical engineering, and chemical distribution and marketing (business). Common minors for chemical engineering students include chemistry, mathematics, green engineering, and biomedical engineering.

Contact:

Department of Chemical Engineering
247 Goodwin Hall
540-231-7127
gwhiting@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Chemical Engineering Curriculum. For more information on the undergraduate curriculum, view the Chemical Engineering Undergraduate Overview and the chemical engineering section of the Undergraduate Course Catalog.

Interest Areas:

  • Biotechnology
  • Environmental
  • Marketing
  • Polymers
  • Analytical skills. Chemical engineers must be able to figure out why a particular design does not work as planned. They must be able to ask the right questions and then find answers that work.
  • Creativity. Chemical engineers must be able to explore new ways of applying engineering principles. They work to invent new materials, advanced manufacturing techniques, and new applications in chemical and biomedical engineering.
  • Ingenuity. Chemical engineers learn the broad concepts of chemical engineering, but their work requires them to apply those concepts to specific production problems.
  • Interpersonal skills. Chemical engineers must develop good working relationships with people in production because their role is to put scientific principles into practice in manufacturing industries.
  • Math skills. Chemical engineers use the principles of calculus and other advanced topics in mathematics for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Problem-solving skills. In designing equipment and processes for manufacturing, these engineers strive to solve several problems at once, including such issues as workers’ safety and problems related to manufacturing and environmental protection. They must also be able to anticipate and identify problems to prevent losses for their employers, safeguard workers’ health, and prevent environmental damage.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Chemical Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biotechnology Environmental Marketing Polymers
Biological Systems Engineering  
Materials Science and Engineering  
Mining Engineering    

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biotechnology Environmental Marketing Polymers
Biological Sciences    
Biochemistry  
Chemistry  
Nanoscience    

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biotechnology Environmental Marketing Polymers
Biomedical Engineering        
Chemistry    
Green Engineering        
Mathematics    
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics  
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Civil engineers are the principal designers, constructors, operators and caretakers of many of the constructed facilities and systems that contribute to the high quality of life enjoyed in the United States. The civil engineer has a major role in providing the many forms of enclosed space used by humans, transportation systems, water supply systems, and the facilities for waste disposal and other human interactions with the physical environment. The emphasis in civil engineering on facilities and systems that form society's infrastructure indicates that public service is a basic characteristic of the profession. Many civil engineers work for public agencies at all levels of government. Significant numbers also work in the private sector, but many of these private firms are consultants who are contractually involved with public infrastructure.

The department further strives to prepare its graduates to play major roles in meeting evolving infrastructure challenges while continuing to advance the tradition of public service associated with the civil engineering profession.

The Charles Edward Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers educational programs to provide breadth of study in all the major areas of civil engineering practice. Student pursuing a BSCE degree will obtain depth of study in one specific area of civil engineering that they choose.

Contact:

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
200 Patton Hall
540-231-7148
karalatt@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Civil Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Construction
  • Environmental
  • Geotechnical
  • Land Development
  • Materials
  • Structures
  • Transportation
  • Water Resources
  • Decision-making skills. Civil engineers often balance multiple and frequently conflicting objectives, such as determining the feasibility of plans with regard to financial costs and safety concerns. Urban and regional planners often look to civil engineers for advice on these issues.
  • Leadership skills. Civil engineers take ultimate responsibility for the projects or research that they perform. Therefore, they must be able to lead surveyors, construction managers, civil engineering technicians, and others to implement their project plan.
  • Math skills. Civil engineers use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, and other advanced topics in mathematics for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Organizational skills. Only licensed civil engineers can sign the design documents for infrastructure projects. This makes it imperative that civil engineers be able to monitor and evaluate the work at the job site as a project progresses to assure compliance with design documents.
  • Problem-solving skills. Civil engineers work at the highest level of planning, design, construction, and operation of multi-faceted projects or research with many variables that require the ability to evaluate and resolve complex problems.
  • Writing skills. Civil engineers must be able to communicate with other professionals, such as architects, landscape architects, and urban and regional planners. This means that civil engineers must be able to write reports clearly so that people without an engineering background can follow.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Civil Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Construction Environmental Geotechnical Land Development Materials Structures Transportation Water Resources
Biological Systems Engineering          
Construction Engineering and Management        
Engineering Science and Mechanics
Industrial and Systems Engineering            
Materials Science and Engineering            
Mining Engineering        

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Construction Environmental Geotechnical Land Development Materials Structures Transportation Water Resources
Architecture*          
Building Construction      
Crop and Soil Sciences        
Environmental Resources Management            
Environmental Science        
Geography              
Landscape Architecture*        
Landscape Contracting        
Meteorology              
Natural Resources Conservation        
Real Estate          
Sustainable Biomaterials    
Theatre: Design and Technology              
Urban Affairs and Planning          
Water            

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Construction Environmental Geotechnical Land Development Materials Structures Transportation Water Resources
Biology            
Chemistry            
Crop and Soil Sciences        
Environmental Policy and Planning      
Geology
Green Engineering        
Landscape Architecture              
Mathematics
Philopsophy, Politics, and Economics    
Real Estate          
Watershed Management        

 

  •  

The Bradley Department of electrical and Computer Engineering administers the degree in computer engineering (CPE). CPE provides the critical technology base for a broad range of industries, including bioinformatics, computing hardware, computer networking and security, embedded computing, telecommunications, and video/image processing. The program builds on a strong foundation in mathematics, physical science, and computer programming.

The curriculum covers a variety of technical areas, including computer architecture, digital system design, VLSI, embedded systems, networking, real-time systems, and artificial intelligence. The program emphasizes industry-related hands-on experiences and opportunities for undergraduate research and co-op/internships.

Contact:

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
340 Whittemore Hall
540-231-8219

For more information on required courses, view the Computer Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Biomedical Applications
  • Computer Systems
  • Cybersecurity
  • Design Automation
  • Embedded Systems
  • Machine Intelligence
  • Networking
  • Analytical skills. Computer engineers analyze complex equipment to determine the best way to improve it.
  • Creativity. Computer engineers design new types of information technology devices.
  • Critical-thinking skills. These engineers use logic and reasoning to clarify goals, examine assumptions, and identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions to problems.
  • Problem-solving skills. Computer engineers identify complex problems in computer hardware, develop and evaluate possible solutions, and figure out the best way to implement them.
  • Speaking skills. Engineers often work on teams and must be able to communicate with other types of engineers as well as with nontechnical team members.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Computer Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomedical Applications Computer Systems Cybersecurity Design Automation Embedded Systems Machine Intelligence Networking
Computer Science  
Electrical Engineering          

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Biomedical Applications Computer Systems Cybersecurity Design Automation Embedded Systems Machine Intelligence Networking
Biochemistry: Bioinformatics            
Business Information Technology*            
Computational Modeling and Data Analytics      
Criminology            
Environmental Informatics        
Mathematics
Music Technology            
Nanoscience        
Neuroscience      
Packaging Systems and Design          
Physics          
Statistics        
Theater Design and Technology          
Visual Communication Design        

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biomedical Applications Computer Systems Cybersecurity Design Automation Embedded Systems Machine Intelligence Networking
Circuits and Electronics            
Computer Science  
Cybersecurity    
Microelectronics            
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Research
Study Abroad

Computer scientists study the design, implementation, performance and usability of computer systems. The program emphasizes software—the aspect of computation that makes computing the powerful and transforming technology it is.

Students acquire a strong foundation in algorithms, problem-solving and software development. A diverse set of elective courses provides experience with emerging technologies in areas such as artificial intelligence, bioinformatics, data analytics, graphics, human computer interaction, Internet programming, networking, parallel computing, and software engineering. A computer science degree prepares students for a wide range of employment options. The degree also serves as good preparation for graduate study in computer science or other information technology fields, as well as business and law.

Contact:

The Department of Computer Science
114 McBryde Hall
540-231-3984
arthurt@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Computer Science Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
  • Human Computer Interaction
  • Knowledge, Information and Data
  • Media/Creative Computing
  • Scientific Computing
  • Software Engineering
  • Systems and Networking
  • Analytical skills. Computer scientists must analyze users’ needs and then design software to meet those needs.
  • Communication skills. Computer scientists must communicate well with other engineers and managers and be able to clearly explain their conclusions to people with no technical background.
  • Computer skills. Computer scientists must understand computer capabilities and languages in order to design effective software.
  • Customer-service skills. Some computer scientists must be able to explain to their customers how the software works and answer any questions that arise.
  • Detail oriented. Computer scientists must pay close attention to their work, because a small error can cause an entire project to fail.
  • Ingenuity. Computer scientists must continually come up with innovative ways to solve problems, particularly when their ideas do not initially work as intended.
  • Interpersonal skills. Computer scientists must be able to work well with others who contribute to designing, developing, and programming successful software.
  • Logical thinking. Computer algorithms rely on logic. Computer scientists must have a talent for reasoning.
  • Math skills. Computer and information research scientists must have knowledge of advanced math and other technical topics that are critical in computing.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Computer Science.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Computational Biology & Bioinformatics Human Computer Interaction Knowledge, Information & Data Media/Creative Computing Scientific Computing Software Engineering Systems & Networking
Aerospace Engineering            
Biological System Engineering            
Computer Engineering          
Electrical Engineering            
Engineering Science and Mechanics          
Industrial and Systems Engineering          
Materials Science and Engineering            
Mechanical Engineering            

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Computational Biology & Bioinformatics Human Computer Interaction Knowledge, Information & Data Media/Creative Computing Scientific Computing Software Engineering Systems & Networking
Accounting & Information Systems*          
Biochemistry            
Biological Sciences            
Business Information Technology*        
Cinema          
Communication Studies            
Computational Modeling and Data Analytics       ✔     
Creative Technologies (in Art)          
Environmental Informatics        
Geography            
Industrial Design*          
Mathematics        
Multimedia Journalism      
Music Technology          
Neuroscience        
Physics            
Psychology            
Statistics        
Visual Communication Design*          

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Computational Biology & Bioinformatics Human Computer Interaction Knowledge, Information & Data Media/Creative Computing Scientific Computing Software Engineering Systems & Networking
Biological Sciences            
Biomedical Engineering            
Business        
Communication          
Cyber Security        
Entrepreneurship            
Industrial Design          
Mathematics          
Music Technology            
Philosophy            
Physics            
Psychology            
Statistics          
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The Construction Engineering and Management (CEM) undergraduate program is administered by the Myers-Lawson School of Construction. Graduates possess the requisite technical, managerial and business knowledge to design, plan, execute and manage construction projects, operations and processes that are safe, efficient, cost effective, environmentally sensitive and socially aware. They are prepared to integrate and manage the technical, materials, financial and human resources that support construction operation and lead project teams toward common objectives with an emphasis on values-based leadership principles.

CEM practitioners work in various organizations in the four sectors of construction: residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy. Their roles include general contractors, construction management firms, specialty contractors, design-builders, consulting engineers, architecture firms, homebuilders, and real estate development firms. Graduates are also employed in various capacities representing project owners, suppliers, regulators, lenders, and other stakeholders engaged in creating and maintaining the built environment. Positions include project engineering, project managers, coordinators, estimators, schedulers, safety specialists, business development managers, and many other. Some rise to senior level executive positions, while others own and operate their own firms.

Contact:

The Myers-Lawson School of Construction
430J Bishop-Favrao Hall
540-231-5376
annlee3@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Construction Engineering and Management Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Smart Design and Construction
  • Human-Centered Issues
  • Project Management
  • Leadership skills. CEM alumni are in positions wherethey can inspire and facilitate teams, can motivate and coach others, and promote values-based leadership. Stakeholders include subcontractors, owners, workers, staff, etc.
  • Project Management skills. Construction Management Engineers are often responsbile for planning the scope, schedule, and budget for construction projects, as well as overseeing the progress of projects, ensuring performance is on time, within scope and budget.
  • Planning skills. Construction Management Engineers must determine how, when, and by whom the work for various engineering projects will be performed.
  • Entrepreneur skills. Construction Management Engineers with broad experience, are often able to start their own firm where business and management skills are needed to be successful. They find that the entrepreneurial and leadership foci in CEM enabled fulfillment of their dreams.
  • Acquisition skills. Construction Management Engineers must obtain the equipment and supplies necessary to complete engineering projects.
  • Writing skills. Construction Management Engineers are often required to draft technical documents and contracts for the necessary work that needs to be completed.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Construction Engineering and Management.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Smart Design and Construction Human-Centered Issues Project Management
Civil Engineering  
Industrial and Systems Engineering  

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Smart Design and Construction Human-Centered Issues Project Management
Architecture*    
Building Construction
Environmental Policy and Planning    
Public and Urban Affairs    
Real Estate    
Sustainable Biomaterials    

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Smart Design and Construction Human-Centered Issues Project Management
Environmental Policy and Planning    
Green Engineering
Public and Urban Affairs    
Real Estate    
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Please review the fun facts below about Construction Engineering and Management:

  • graduates experience 100% job placement with 5+ offers
  • the program focuses on all four sections of the industry (residential, commercial, industrial, and heavy)
  • students are placed in a variety of companies (contractors, design/build firms, government, utilities, subcontractors)
  • the program is backed by an industry board of over 50 industry leaders
  • sophomores and juniors have an opportunity to participate in an industry mentoring program
  • the program hosts construction career fairs focused specifically on the construction industry

The Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer engineering administers the degree in electrical engineering (EE). EE provides the fundamental basis for many key industries, including bioengineering, micro/nanoelectronics, power systems, robotics, telecommunications, and space science. The program builds on a strong foundation in mathematics, physical science, and computer programming.

The curriculum covers a variety of technical areas, including control systems and robotics, communications, digital design, networking, electromagnetics, electronics, power systems, and signal processing. The program emphasizes hands-on experiences and broad opportunities for undergraduate research and co-op/internships in industry. The department also offers a concentration in power electronics and a minor in microelectronics.

Contact:

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
340 Whittemore Hall
540-231-8219

For more information on required courses, view the Electrical Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Circuits and Electronics
  • Communications
  • Electromagnetics
  • Power Systems
  • Systems and Controls
 
  • Concentration. Electrical engineers design and develop complex electrical systems and electronic components and products. They must be able to keep track of multiple design elements and technical characteristics when performing these tasks.
  • Initiative. Electrical engineers must be able to apply their academic knowledge to new tasks in every project they undertake. In addition, they must engage in continuing education to keep up with changes in technology.
  • Interpersonal skills. Electrical engineers must be able to work with others during the manufacturing process to ensure that their plans are implemented correctly. This collaboration includes monitoring technicians and devising remedies to problems as they arise.
  • Math skills. Electrical engineers must be able to use the principles of calculus and other advanced topics in math in order to analyze, design, and troubleshoot equipment.
  • Speaking skills. Electrical engineers work closely with other engineers and technicians. They must be able to explain their designs and reasoning clearly and to relay instructions during product development and production. They may also need to explain complex issues to customers who have little or no technical expertise.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Electrical Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomedical Applications Communications Electromagnetics Circuits and Systems Systems and Controls
Aerospace Engineering    
Computer Engineering    
Computer Science      
Mechanical Engineering      

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Circuits and Electronics Communications Electromagnetics Power Systems Systems and Controls
Business Information Technology*        
Environmental Informatics    
Mathematics
Meteorology      
Music Technology      
Nanoscience      
Neuroscience      
Packaging Systems and Design        
Physics
Statistics        
Sustainable Biomaterials        
Theatre Design and Technology        

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biomedical Applications Communications Electromagnetics Circuits and Systems Systems and Controls
Computer Science      
Mathematics    
Physics        
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Engineering science and mechanics (ESM) uses fundamental principles to develop engineering solutions to contemporary problems. These fundamental principles include mechanics—the response of solids and fluids to forces—as well as physics and mathematics. While the applications may change, these fundamental principles remain relevant. As a result, ESM graduates are ideally adaptable to 21st century needs where the problems to be solved change rapidly.

Students for whom ESM is a good fit want to know not only the what of engineering, but also the how and the why. They want to work on the cutting edge, bridging the gap between physical theory from science and mathematics to the engineering applications. During their academic studies, ESM students work in small groups in state-of-the-art laboratories. They engage in undergraduate research with award-winning faculty and graduate students. Electives provide students the opportunities to focus on their individual interests in areas such as biomechanics, applied physics, the development and analysis of advanced materials (including nanotechnology).

Contact:

The Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics
225 Norris Hall
540-231-4965

For more information on required courses, view the Engineering Science and Mechanics Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Biomechanics
  • Complex Systems Dynamics
  • Engineering Physics
  • Fluid Flow
  • Solid Mechanics and Materials
  • Broad thinking. Mechanicists combine a variety of engineering disciplines to execute their work and must be able to have a "big picture" viewpoint in their work.
  • Problem solving. Mechanicists provide solutions to mechanical problems through the integrated application of mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles.
  • Math skills. Mechanicists delve deep into the field of mechanics and take more rigorous math courses than the typical mechanical engineer.
  • Analytical skills. Mechanicists must understand and analyze the fundamentals of all mechanical sciences.
  • Physics skills. Mechanicists specifically focus on the physical principles underlying modern engineering design.
  • Ingenuity. Mechanicists learn the broad concepts of engineering mechanics and the physical sciences, but their work and/or research requires them to apply those concepts to specific problems.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Engineering Science and Mechanics.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomechanics Complex System Dynamics Engineering Physics Fluid Flows Solid Mechanics and Materials
Aerospace Engineering    
Biological Systems Engineering      
Civil Engineering        
Electrical Engineering      
Materials Science and Engineering        
Mechanical Engineering    
Ocean Engineering    

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomechanics Complex System Dynamics Engineering Physics Fluid Flows Solid Mechanics and Materials
Biochemistry: Bioinformatics        
Mathematics
Physics      

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biomechanics Complex System Dynamics Engineering Physics Fluid Flows Solid Mechanics and Materials
Biomedical Engineering
Green Engineering      
Mathematics
Physics      
Naval Engineering    
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  •  
Type Organization
Professional
Research
Study Abroad

 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, development, improvement, implementation and evaluation of integrated work systems comprised of people, information and knowledge, equipment, energy, materials, and processes. The Industrial and Systems Engineering Department utilizes innovative and creative practices and technologies to achieve the highest quality of instruction and student learning.

Coursework encompasses operations research, manufacturing systems engineering, human factors engineering and ergonomics, and management systems engineering. The curriculum addresses not only the physical and technical aspects of systems, but also the organizational, economic, business, and human elements of systems.

Students develop not only technical capabilities but also professional skills such as teamwork, communication, ethics, and lifelong learning.

 

Contact:

The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
243 Durham Hall
540-231-6388
vestjs@vt.edu or pcuren@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Industrial and Systems Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics
  • Management Systems
  • Manufacturing Systems
  • Operations Research
  • Creativity. Industrial engineers use creativity and ingenuity to design new production processes in many kinds of settings to reduce use of material resources, time, or labor while accomplishing desired performance results.
  • Critical-thinking skills. Industrial engineers create new systems to solve problems related to waste and inefficiency. Solving these problems requires logic and reasoning to identify strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions, or approaches to the problems.
  • Listening skills. These engineers often operate in teams to integrate many functions and roles within a company, but they must also solicit feedback from customers, vendors, and production staff. They must listen to customers, employees, and managers to fully grasp ideas and problems the first time.
  • Math skills. Industrial engineers use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, linear algebra, probability, statistics, and other advanced topics in mathematics for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Problem-solving skills. In designing systems and processes for all types of organizations (manufacturing, logistics, service, healthcare, retail, entertainment, etc.), these engineers address complex problems, from employee safety to quality to costs to leadtime to customer satisfaction.
  • Speaking skills. Industrial engineers have to explain their analyses, recommendations, and solutions to a variety of audiences, which may include frontline employees, technical staff, executive management, and/or customers. Being able to explain concepts clearly and quickly is crucial to preventing costly mistakes and loss of time.
  • Writing skills. Industrial engineers must create technical documentation related to their project work for other stakeholders or for future reference. The documentation must be coherent and explain their thinking clearly so that others can understand the information.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Industrial and Systems Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Management Systems Manufacturing Systems Operations Research
Computer Science    
Mechanical Engineering      

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Management Systems Manufacturing Systems Operations Research
Applied Economics Management    
Business Information Technology*    ✔  
Industrial Design*    
Management*    
Packaging Systems and Design    
Statistics      

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Human Factors Engineering and Ergonomics Management Systems Manufacturing Systems Operations Research
Applied Business Computing      
Business      
Computer Science    
Green Engineering    
Mathematics      
Packaging Science    
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics    
Statistics      
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Materials science and engineering pertains to the structure, properties, design, development, manufacture, and engineering application of materials of all types. Students may specialize in a number of materials technology areas including ceramics, metals, polymers, or electronic and photonic materials. Students also can design a special program of elective study, such as biomaterials or green engineering, among others.

Graduates are employed in aerospace, automotive, chemical and material, communications, electronics, petroleum and energy, and basic materials-producing industries. Students may qualify for graduate study in engineering, the sciences, medicine, law, and business.

Contact:

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering
142 Randolph Hall
540-231-1768
mczamans@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Materials Science and Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Biomaterials
  • Ceramics
  • Composites
  • Electronic Materials
  • Metals
  • Polymers
  •  Analytical skills. Materials engineers often work on projects related to other fields of engineering. They must be able to determine how materials will be used in a wide variety of conditions and how the materials must be structured to withstand the requirements of those conditions.
  • Math skills. Materials engineers use the principles of calculus and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Problem-solving skills. Materials engineers must understand the relationship between the structure of materials and their properties and means of processing, and how these factors affect the product. They must also figure out why a product might have failed, design a solution, and then conduct tests to make sure the product does not fail again. This involves being able to identify root causes when many factors could be at fault.
  • Speaking skills. In supervising technicians, technologists, and other engineers, materials engineers must be able to state concepts and directions clearly. When speaking with managers at high-level meetings, these engineers must also be able to communicate engineering concepts to people who do not have an engineering background.
  • Writing skills. Materials engineers must write plans and reports clearly so that people without a materials engineering background can understand the concepts.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Materials Science and Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomaterials Ceramics Composites Electronic Materials Metals Polymers
Aerospace Engineering    
Biological Systems Engineering        
Chemical Engineering      
Civil Engineering  
Computer Science          
Engineering Science and Mechanics
Mechanical Engineering      
Mining Engineering      

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Biomaterials Ceramics Composites Electronic Materials Metals Polymers
Biological Sciences      
Chemistry      
Geosciences      
Mathematics      
Nanoscience
Packaging Systems and Design      
Sustainable Bio Materials      

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Biomaterials Ceramics Composites Electronic Materials Metals Polymers
Biomedical Engineering
Chemistry
Geosciences      
Green Engineering          
Mathematics  
Microelectronics          
Packaging Sicence          
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
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Mechanical engineering is perhaps the broadest of the engineering disciplines with students working in a wide range of technical areas. These include acoustics, computer aided design and analysis, controls, energy conversion and management, mechanical design, mechatronics, and propulsion, among many others. Several courses in nuclear engineering have been added in the mechanical engineering program in recent years. The curriculum provides a strong fundamental background in the engineering sciences as well as mathematics, statistics, thermal fluid engineering, vibrations and controls, and mechanical design. This background is strengthened with instructional laboratories and design courses. Graduates are prepared for professional engineering careers or graduate study.

Contact:

The Department of Mechanical Engineering
113 Randolph Hall

For more information on required courses, view the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Automotive
  • Industrial Design
  • Nuclear
  • Robotics
  • Creativity. Mechanical engineers design and build complex pieces of equipment and machinery. A creative mind is essential for this kind of work.
  • Listening skills. Mechanical engineers often work on projects with other engineers and professionals, such as architects. They must listen to and analyze different approaches to the task at hand.
  • Math skills. Mechanical engineers use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Mechanical skills. Mechanical skills allow engineers to apply basic engineering concepts and mechanical processes to the design of new devices.
  • Problem-solving skills. Mechanical engineers take scientific discoveries and seek to make them into products that would be useful to people, companies, and governments. Experience gained through laboratory courses at university or a cooperative education program in college helps mechanical engineers develop skills that are useful in solving real-world problems.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Mechanical Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Automotive Industrial Design Nuclear Robotics
Aerospace Engineering    
Electrical Engineering  
Engineering Science and Mechanics  
Materials Science and Engineering
Ocean Engineering    

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Automotive Industrial Design Nuclear Robotics
Management*    
Statistics
Physics  

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Automotive Industrial Design Nuclear Robotics
Circuits and Electronics    
Engineering Science and Mechanics  
Green Engineering
Mathematics
Naval Engineering    
Physics  
Science, Engineering, and Law
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Mining engineering is a field where aspects of geosciences are combined with engineering and management for the development and recovery of the world’s mineral resources.

Areas of study include mineral exploration, evaluation, development, extraction, mineral processing, and environmental management.

The program provides a general background in all aspects of the mining industry. Graduates find employment in the mining of construction aggregates, coal, copper, gold, phosphate, mineral sands, and many other commodities.

Contact:

The Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering
100 Holden Hall
540-231-6671
mineinfo@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Mining Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Exploration
  • Evaluation
  • Development
  • Extraction
  • Processing
  • Environmental Management
  • Analytical skills. Mining engineers must consider the wider implications of their immediate work to plan for environmental reclamation. They must be able to consider several competing, but interconnected, issues at the same time.
  • Decision-making skills. These engineers perform work that can affect not only companies’ profits but also miners’ lives. The ability to anticipate problems and deal with them immediately is crucial.
  • Logical-thinking skills. In planning mines’ operations, mineral processing, and environmental reclamation, these engineers have to be able to put work plans into a coherent, logical sequence.
  • Math skills. Mining engineers use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Problem-solving skills. Mining engineers must explore for mines, plan the operations of mines, work out the mineral processing, and design environmental reclamation projects. These are all complex projects requiring an ability to identify and work toward goals, while solving problems along the way.
  • Writing skills. Mining engineers must prepare reports and instructions for other workers. Therefore, they must be able to write clearly so that others can easily understand their thoughts and plans.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Mining Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Exploration Evaluation Development Extraction Processing Environmental Management
Chemical Engineering        
Civil Engineering    
Materials Science and Engineering        

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:
NOTE: Majors denoted with an * are restricted majors at Virginia Tech.

  Exploration Evaluation Development Extraction Processing Environmental Management
Environmental Policy and Planning          
Environmental Resources Management          
Geography
Geosciences    
Landscape Architecture*          
Public and Urbain Affairs          
Sustainable Biomaterials          

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Exploration Evaluation Development Extraction Processing Environmental Management
Environmental Policy and Plannning          
Geosciences    
Green Engineering          
Philosophy, Politics, and Economics          
Public and Urban Affairs          
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Ocean engineering deals with the design of ships of all types. The field is often called naval architecture. It involves fluid mechanics, propulsion, structures, vehicle dynamics, and marine engineering. The curriculum culminates in an international award-winning design sequence in which students design a complete ship.

The program is closely related to aerospace engineering, and the two programs share a major portion of their course requirements. A double aerospace and ocean engineering major is available to students desiring this combination.

Contact:

The Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering
224-A Randolph Hall
540-231-6699
mkapania@vt.edu

For more information on required courses, view the Ocean Engineering Curriculum.

Interest Areas:

  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Marine Engineering
  • Propulsion
  • Structures
  • Vehicle Dynamics

 

  • Communication skills. Marine engineers and naval architects must be able to give clear instructions and explain complex concepts when leading teams of professionals on projects.
  • Ingenuity. Marine engineers and naval architects must employ operations analysis to create a design that will most likely perform the ship’s functions, and then employ skills of critical thinking to anticipate and correct any deficiencies before the ship is built or set to sea.
  • Interpersonal skills. Marine engineers and naval architects meet with clients to analyze their needs for ship systems. Engineers must be able to discuss progress with clients to keep redesign options open before the project is too far along.
  • Math skills. Marine engineers and naval architects use the principles of calculus, trigonometry, and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.
  • Problem-solving skills. Marine engineers must design several systems for ships that work well together. Naval architects and marine engineers are expected to solve problems for their clients. They must draw on their knowledge and experience to make effective decisions.
  • Information from the Occupational Outlook Handbook.

Located below students can find related majors and complementary minors available at Virginia Tech as they relate to the interest areas in Ocean Engineering.

Related majors within the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Fluid Mechanics Marine Engineering Propulsion Structures Vehicle Dynamics
Aerospace Engineering  
Electrical Engineering        
Engineering Science and Mechanics  
Materials Science and Engineering      
Mechanical Engineering

Related majors outside the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech:

  Fluid Mechanics Marine Engineering Propulsion Structures Vehicle Dynamics
Fish Conservation: Marine Fisheries Conservation        
Geography        
Mathematics  
Physics  

Complementary minors at Virginia Tech:

  Fluid Mechanics Marine Engineering Propulsion Structures Vehicle Dynamics
Geography        
Mathematics  
Naval Engineering
Physics
  • Candid Career
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